Connecting the Dots between health, food, and
environmental science, policy, action, and community...
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Archive for Environment and Health

Can We Solve Our Health Problems One Person at a Time?

Thursday, December 29th, 2016

What’s the difference between health prevention, health care, and public health? Health prevention tries to address the causes of health imbalance and disease. Health care treats an individual after symptoms or disease manifests. Public health tries to remove disease contributors— that affect all people. The bottom line is that some health concerns must be addressed through health care and making the right personal health choices. But some disease contributors can only be addressed by modifying societal health choices.

Let’s first clarify the difference between personal and societal health choices— and the connection between them. On the personal level, if my friend, Ralph chooses to regularly over-eat foods known to produce gain weight, his personal decision may drive him towards obesity. On the societal level, if corporate influence, regulations, laws, subsidies, and social policies make fattening foods cheap and available, then these policies will drive Ralph— and millions of others— towards weight gain and obesity. Read More→

Listen to Dr. David M. Brady, ND discuss his new book, The Fibro-Fix: Get to the Root of Your Fibromyalgia and Start Reversing Your Chronic Pain and Fatigue in 21 Days to learn why a combination of toxins, stress, and abuse are producing an epidemic in conversation with Alison Rose Levy.

Since January 2011, Connect the Dots is a weekly show on the Progressive Radio Network hosted by food, health, and environmental journalist, Alison Rose Levy. Each week through in-depth interviews with different thought leaders, advocates, scientists, authors, and experts, we connect the dots between personal wellbeing and the total environment.

Published on AlterNet
Wilma Subra has studied the biological impacts of industrial and naturally occurring chemicals for over twenty-five years. When chemical spills or toxic industrial releases affect unsuspecting communities, Subra — a distinguished microbiologist and chemist — often gets called in to investigate. Her experiences have taught her that the contamination of communities and waterways is just part of doing business for multinational corporations and it is becoming a significant, growing byproduct of our current, poorly regulated industrial practices. Read More→

Connect the Dots: Maya Shetreat- Klein: The Dirt Cure

Monday, February 15th, 2016

Listen to Connect the Dots: I interview Maya Shetreat-Klein, MD, author of The Dirt Cure: Growing Healthy Kids With Foods Straight From Soil. We talk about the connection between childhood allergies and immune disorders and all the toxins and additives in food and other products. http://connectthedots.podbean.com/2016/02/
Since January 2011, Connect the Dots is a weekly show on the Progressive Radio Network hosted by food, health, and environmental journalist, Alison Rose Levy. Each week through in-depth interviews with different thought leaders, advocates, scientists, authors, and experts, we connect the dots between personal wellbeing and the total environment.

In response to a plunge in sales of artificially sweetened sodas last week, Coca-Cola announced plans to roll out an ad campaign to win back popular favor for its aspartame-containing beverage, Diet Coke. (Diet Pepsi, which also contained aspartame, saw its sales fall 6.2 percent in 2012 while regular Pepsi sales fell little more than half that amount.)
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Lautenberg’s Legacy and the Chemical Regs He Championed

Saturday, June 15th, 2013

When Senator Frank Lautenberg (D-NJ) died Monday morning at age 89, the Senate lost its oldest member, (he was also the last WWII veteran), and proponents of toxic chemical safety, gun safety, and other protections lost a champion. His most enduring legacy should have been the passage of the Safe Chemicals Act he first introduced in 2010.

But due to pressure and lobbying by the chemical industry, the original version of the bill never made it to the Senate floor for a vote despite Lautenberg’s committed work (in alliance with a coalition of environment groups) to get a vote on it every year from 2010 to 2012. The American Chemistry Council opposed the bill, and via lobbyists, campaign contributions, and paid advertising for select candidates stalled forward momentum.
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Why Safe Regulation of Fracking is a Fiction

Monday, February 18th, 2013

A New York State commissioned Health Review is central to the debate over whether fracking can be done safely in New York. The long awaited release of the Review findings, commissioned in September by the state Department of Health (DOH) at Governor Andrew Cuomo’s behest, will inform the Governor’s impending decision about whether or not to go forward with proposed fracking guidelines, the prelude to permits to frack New York State.

Listen to Fracking: NY Reprieve for Health with Larysa Dyrszka MD and Roger Downs of the Sierra Club on Connect the Dots on the Progressive Radio Network.

The the perennial promises of safer regulations fail to account for fracking as the next in an ever-growing and ever more toxic series of health-damaging industrial outputs that people inhale, eat, or absorb into their skin, guts, and brains. When industry has blocked the EPA from studying or regulating 70,000 chemicals, (from BPA and flame retardants to potent neurotoxins), since 1975, why would regulating fracking be possible? Read More→

Why 911 Survivors Fear Next Explosion

Friday, January 18th, 2013

When some 9/11 responders–many with health issues from that crisis–sought to regain their health, many settled in the small town of “Guns and Hoses,” the nickname of Minisink, N.Y. The many police and firemen who live there (in keeping with residency parameters imposed on NYC emergency service employees) never could have foreseen that within a few years, Minisink (located north of NYC) would become a high-risk zone for gas explosions and contamination, thanks to a plan to build a major compressor station for a gas pipeline–smack in the center of town.

Listen to Pramilla Malick of StopMCS and Tanyette Colon of MUST discuss Minisink on Connect the Dots on Progressive Radio.

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Which Politician Can Face Up to “Weather on Steroids?”

Sunday, November 4th, 2012

This week climate change went from political taboo to lead endorsement criteria for at least one elected official—New York City’s Mayor Bloomberg, who endorsed Barack Obama in a BloombergView entitled “A Vote for a President to Lead on Climate Change.”

Listen to Jason Kowalski, Policy Director of 350.org on Connect the Dots on Progressive Radio

In his editorial, Bloomberg wrote that, “Our climate is changing. And while the increase in extreme weather we have experienced in New York City and around the world may or may not be the result of it, the risk that it might be — given this week’s devastation — should compel all elected leaders to take immediate action.” Read More→

Now that the Senate turned thumbs down on the Keystone XL Pipeline, it’s time to celebrate a big win for the environment. It was just last fall that Bil MCKibben warned that, “It’s game over for slowing climate change, if we proceed with the Tar Sands XL Keystone Pipeline.” So says Bill McKibben of 350.org quoting NASA scientist James Hansen. Back in November,  McKibben invited people  to join him at the White House for the Tar Sands action, calling it “the flashpoint for environmental protection.”
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